5 Most Common Soccer Injuries

Soccer is one of the leading sports in the world. With its continuous rise in popularity, comes with an increase in the number of soccer-related incidents, too. The moment your loved one breaks a bone or suffers from a sports-related injury, you will dread the sounds of their cries because of the unbearable pain. Whatever cause that may be, there are numerous ways to prevent soccer or any sports-related injury.

Here are the common injuries you might encounter:

1.Jones Fracture

Contact sports are a prevalent cause of fractures. In soccer, the most common can be found in the lower extremities. Fractures located at the tibia and fibula are commonly found in younger soccer players, while jones and femur fractures are more prevalent in older soccer players. To prevent these occurrences, you can wear protective equipment like shin guards and knee pads to provide shock absorption and promote energy distribution, thereby lowering the risk for such injuries. Avoid overtraining and abrupt change in footwear, as well.

2. Ankle Sprain

This is extremely common in all kinds of sports. It results in injuring the ligaments on the lateral side of the ankle, causing swelling and inflammation. A mild ankle sprain may cause a few practices to be missed depending on the severity of the injury. Surgical intervention is rarely needed for an acute ankle sprain. Interventions include applying a cold and warm compress, immobilization of the affected area, and physical therapy if needed. There are soccer gears available such as ankle support, to lessen the risk of these types of injuries.

3. Ligament Tear (ACL Tear)

red

We’ve all heard about ACL tear from other sports players at some point in our lives. Anterior Crucial Ligament is located at the center of the knee, which is responsible front to back movement of the knee. ACL tears are more commonly found in adults and skeletally immature teenage athletes. These injuries will result in painful weight-bearing, swelling of the knee, and pain. The preferred treatment for this injury is surgery to restore stability of the knee. Physical therapy and overall recovery can take up to six to twelve months.

4. Adductor Strain

Athletes who require a sudden shift in movement and position are at the highest risk for this kind of injury. A strain is usually caused by a stretch or a tear of the muscle or tendons. Injury of muscle on the medial side of the thigh, or what we call adductor strain, can be painful while it heals but doesn’t require surgery to fix.

5. Hamstring Strain

Acute hamstring strains, sometimes called pulled hamstring, are injuries of muscle or tendons located at the posterior part of your thigh. These muscles or tendons get stretched or torn, resulting in pain. It may or may not require surgery for recovery.

These are just a few common injuries that may result in playing soccer. These minor injuries may or may not require surgical intervention. However, severe injuries like a contusion, internal hemorrhage, and open fracture are still possible, especially if not wearing the right gear and if no proper training is done.